18 Most Terrifying and Dangerous Mountain Roads in Europe

Stop reading now if you can’t handle heights well. We’ve looked high and low all over Europe (mostly high) for the most terrifying – or fantastic, depending on your preference for deep abysses – and dangerous mountain roads. Now it’s time for you to watch some of Europe’s most challenging drives.

Esbjörn Guwallius |

Gorges de Galamus, France

This is one of France’s famous balcony roads, with a straight drop to the Gorges de Galamus river 300 meters below. The road is very narrow, and two cars can’t meet for long stretches. Be prepared to use the reverse around the bli… Read full text

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Gorges de Galamus, France

This is one of France’s famous balcony roads, with a straight drop to the Gorges de Galamus river 300 meters below. The road is very narrow, and two cars can’t meet for long stretches. Be prepared to use the reverse around the blind corners of this road.

Sveti Jure, Croatia

At the top of the Sveti Jure mountain lies the highest church in Croatia, the Sveti Jure chapel. It was built in 1646 but was moved a few meters in 1964 to make room for a TV tower. The road to the top is nothing but terrible – or… Read full text

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Sveti Jure, Croatia

At the top of the Sveti Jure mountain lies the highest church in Croatia, the Sveti Jure chapel. It was built in 1646 but was moved a few meters in 1964 to make room for a TV tower. The road to the top is nothing but terrible – or beautiful – depending on your affection for heights. The guardrails along the road are not always what they should be, and on the other side, there’s a free fall of up to 1,000 meters. The last 3 kilometers are the worst, with an incline of up to 14 percent. Check the weather conditions before your trip, as it’s often very windy and foggy at the top. Breezy and misty conditions can make this route a dangerous road. There’s a fee to enter the road to Sveti Jure, around USD 10 per person (2021).

Tremola Passstrasse, Gotthardpass, Switzerland

Through 24 cobblestoned hairpin bends, this old road takes you to the top of the Saint Gotthard Pass, with an elevation of 2,091 meters above sea level. The road was built between 1827 and 1832 but appears today as it was in 1951…. Read full text

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Tremola Passstrasse, Gotthardpass, Switzerland

Through 24 cobblestoned hairpin bends, this old road takes you to the top of the Saint Gotthard Pass, with an elevation of 2,091 meters above sea level. The road was built between 1827 and 1832 but appears today as it was in 1951. This mountainous and dangerous road is a popular tourist attraction during the summer.

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GC-606, Gran Canaria, Spain

Have you ever dreamt about driving through the Wild West – in Europe? Then this is the road for you. GC-606 has 23 hairpin turns along its 12 km stretch through the mountains of western Gran Canaria. Having a fear of heights is no… Read full text

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GC-606, Gran Canaria, Spain

Have you ever dreamt about driving through the Wild West – in Europe? Then this is the road for you. GC-606 has 23 hairpin turns along its 12 km stretch through the mountains of western Gran Canaria. Having a fear of heights is not an option if you’re taking this route.

Lysevegen, Norway

Lysevegen is one of Norway’s famous hairpin roads, this one featuring 27 narrows hairpins and a U-shaped tunnel that turns 340 degrees inside the mountain. The views from the top are stunning, and there’s also a decent café. Parki… Read full text

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Lysevegen, Norway

Lysevegen is one of Norway’s famous hairpin roads, this one featuring 27 narrows hairpins and a U-shaped tunnel that turns 340 degrees inside the mountain. The views from the top are stunning, and there’s also a decent café. Parking at the top is USD 35 for the day (2021), but there’s free parking a few hairpins down the road if you don’t mind walking along this mountainous road.

Sa Calobra, Mallorca, Spain

“The Snake” is one of the most beautiful and dangerous roads on the Spanish island of Mallorca. The road has gotten its ophidian nickname because of its shape, as it features some horrific hairpin turns with up to 11,5 percent gra… Read full text

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Sa Calobra, Mallorca, Spain

“The Snake” is one of the most beautiful and dangerous roads on the Spanish island of Mallorca. The road has gotten its ophidian nickname because of its shape, as it features some horrific hairpin turns with up to 11,5 percent gradient. One curve, the “Nus de Sa Corbata” or The Necktie, is a curve of 360 degrees, going under itself. Stunning views, though.

Delchevo Road, Bulgaria

The road to the small Bulgarian village Delchevo (in the Blagoevgrad Province) is a steep 8 kilometers long mountainous climb with several hairpin turns. The town is a popular tourist destination with stunning views of the Rhodope… Read full text

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Delchevo Road, Bulgaria

The road to the small Bulgarian village Delchevo (in the Blagoevgrad Province) is a steep 8 kilometers long mountainous climb with several hairpin turns. The town is a popular tourist destination with stunning views of the Rhodope Mountains and the Mesta river valley.

Trollstigen, Norway

Trollstigen, or The Troll Ladder, is a dramatic mountain road in western Norway with scenic views along the way. The road opened in 1936 and has 11 sharp hairpin turns. The incline is around 9 percent.

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Trollstigen, Norway

Trollstigen, or The Troll Ladder, is a dramatic mountain road in western Norway with scenic views along the way. The road opened in 1936 and has 11 sharp hairpin turns. The incline is around 9 percent.

Dolomites Mountains, Italy

A drive through Dolomites mountains on the Great Dolomites Road from Monte Grappa to Cima Grappa in Italy. The road features stunning mountain and countryside views with lots of twists and turns and a few tunnels.

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Dolomites Mountains, Italy

A drive through Dolomites mountains on the Great Dolomites Road from Monte Grappa to Cima Grappa in Italy. The road features stunning mountain and countryside views with lots of twists and turns and a few tunnels.

Anfo Ridge Road, Italy

Anfo Ridge Road, in Lombardy, Italy, has been dubbed one of the most dangerous roads in the world. It’s partly unpaved with recurring rockfalls that can close off the road at any time. It has a grade of up to 12 percent and includ… Read full text

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Anfo Ridge Road, Italy

Anfo Ridge Road, in Lombardy, Italy, has been dubbed one of the most dangerous roads in the world. It’s partly unpaved with recurring rockfalls that can close off the road at any time. It has a grade of up to 12 percent and includes several short tunnels.

Col du Chaussy, France

The first and most scenic stretch of the road to Col du Chaussy is called the “Lacets de Montvernier”. It consists of 18 narrow hairpin turns as the road practically climbs a big cliff. After the “lacets,” the route continues thro… Read full text

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Col du Chaussy, France

The first and most scenic stretch of the road to Col du Chaussy is called the “Lacets de Montvernier”. It consists of 18 narrow hairpin turns as the road practically climbs a big cliff. After the “lacets,” the route continues through small villages, with a total climb of about 1,000 meters, to the top of Col du Chaussy.

Mangart Road, Slovenia

The Mangart Pass is a mountain saddle in the Julian Alps, on the border between Italy and Slovenia. Built in 1938, the Mangart Road (“Mangartska Cesta”) that leads over the saddle is the highest-lying road in Slovenia with an elev… Read full text

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Mangart Road, Slovenia

The Mangart Pass is a mountain saddle in the Julian Alps, on the border between Italy and Slovenia. Built in 1938, the Mangart Road (“Mangartska Cesta”) that leads over the saddle is the highest-lying road in Slovenia with an elevation of 2,055 meters. The narrow paved road, which features several hairpins, has some very steep parts with an incline of up to 23 percent.

Hardknott Pass, United Kingdom

Hardknott Pass is a real rollercoaster drive through green hills and flocks of sheep in Cumbria. Very steep inclines, and then as steep downhill on the other side. Make sure you have good brakes, as the gradient goes well over 30 … Read full text

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Hardknott Pass, United Kingdom

Hardknott Pass is a real rollercoaster drive through green hills and flocks of sheep in Cumbria. Very steep inclines, and then as steep downhill on the other side. Make sure you have good brakes, as the gradient goes well over 30 percent. Expect a very demanding drive on this dangerous road.

Stelvio Pass, Italy

The Stelvio Pass is the highest stretch of road in the Eastern European Alps. The original road was constructed 1820–1825 by the Austrian Empire, to connect the former Austrian province of Lombardy with the rest of Austria. The ro… Read full text

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Stelvio Pass, Italy

The Stelvio Pass is the highest stretch of road in the Eastern European Alps. The original road was constructed 1820–1825 by the Austrian Empire, to connect the former Austrian province of Lombardy with the rest of Austria. The road climbs 1,871 meters through 48 hairpin turns (although some count it as 75 hairpins or switchbacks). The British TV show “Top Gear” named The Stelvio Pass as its pick for the “greatest driving road in the world”, an honor that was later bestowed upon the Transfăgărășan Highway in Romania.

Transalpina, Romania

The Transalpina stretches for 148 kilometers through the Carpathian Mountains and is the highest road in Romania. The highest point is located in the Urdele Pass at 2,145 meters. This road, known as “Poteca Dracului” or the “Devil… Read full text

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Transalpina, Romania

The Transalpina stretches for 148 kilometers through the Carpathian Mountains and is the highest road in Romania. The highest point is located in the Urdele Pass at 2,145 meters. This road, known as “Poteca Dracului” or the “Devil’s Path,” was originally a mountain path. It was used by shepherds to cross the mountains with their sheep herds. This mountain route offers some stunning scenery, as it’s virtually surrounding you with nature.

Pico del Veleta, Spain

The high-altitude road to Pico del Veleta, which takes you to approximately 10 meters below the summit, is the highest paved road in Europe. It is closed to general traffic beyond Hoya del la Mora but is open for cyclists and walk… Read full text

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Pico del Veleta, Spain

The high-altitude road to Pico del Veleta, which takes you to approximately 10 meters below the summit, is the highest paved road in Europe. It is closed to general traffic beyond Hoya del la Mora but is open for cyclists and walkers. There’s also a microbus service that takes passengers to a viewpoint 3,100 meters above sea level.

Stalheimskleiva, Norway

The Stalheimskleiva Road is Northern Europe’s steepest road, with an incline of up to 20 percent. The route runs between two cascading waterfalls and offers the driver 13 sharp hairpin bends, along with stunning scenery. The Stalh… Read full text

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Stalheimskleiva, Norway

The Stalheimskleiva Road is Northern Europe’s steepest road, with an incline of up to 20 percent. The route runs between two cascading waterfalls and offers the driver 13 sharp hairpin bends, along with stunning scenery. The Stalheimskleiva road was built 1842–1846 and used to be part of the main road but is nowadays a tourist attraction.

Combe Laval, France

The Combe Laval road is a French balcony road in the Vercors massif that opened in 1898. A balcony road means that the route essentially is carved out of the cliff. Originally built to transport timber, it’s now mainly used by tou… Read full text

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Combe Laval, France

The Combe Laval road is a French balcony road in the Vercors massif that opened in 1898. A balcony road means that the route essentially is carved out of the cliff. Originally built to transport timber, it’s now mainly used by tourists looking for a thrilling adventure or scenic views. The road runs along a gorge, with a free fall of several hundred meters on the other side of the guard walls.

Please note

This list is only for entertainment purposes. We do not recommend driving on these roads.

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